Category Archives: movies with a big ‘H’

The Gorgon (1964)

A small German town falls prey to an unseen monster that turns its victims into lifeless statues in this mid-’60s outing from Hammer Studios. When the girlfriend of bohemian artist Bruno Heitz (Jeremy Longhurst) becomes the latest townsperson to turn up dead, her corpse transformed to stone, Bruno hangs himself, leaving the town to assume his guilt. But when his father, Prof. Heitz (Michael Goodliffe), comes to investigate, he too encounters the Gorgon and turns to stone. Just before dying, the professor dashes off instructions to his other son, Paul (Richard Pasco), about how to exonerate Bruno. Suspicion falls on Dr. Namaroff (Peter Cushing), proprietor of the local madhouse, although one of his patients (Joyce Hemson) seems just as likely a culprit. Then along comes Prof. Carl Maister (Christopher Lee), a folklore expert from the University of Leipzig, who claims that the murderer is actually a human possessed by the spirit of Magaera, one of Medusa’s snake-haired sisters from Greek mythology. Together, Paul and Dr. Namaroff attempt to root out the incognito Gorgon while Paul courts lovely amnesiac Carla Hoffman (Barbara Shelley). Directed by Hammer veteran Terence Fisher, The Gorgon is one of several films to feature British horror mainstays Lee and Cushing side by side. In the States, the film appeared with The Curse of the Mummy’s Tomb on a double bill promoted by the distribution of a unique giveaway item: black stamps. (ROTTEN TOMATOES)

Gremlins (1984)

“Don’t expose him to bright light. Don’t ever get him wet. And don’t ever, ever feed him after midnight.” This sage advice is ignored midway through Gremlins, with devastating results. This comic Joe Dante effort is set in a Norman Rockwell-esque small town at Christmastime. Seeking a unique gift for his son an erstwhile inventor (Hoyt Axton) purchases a cute, fuzzy little “Mogwai” from a Chinatown shopkeeper’s (Keye Luke) grandson (John Louie), who dispenses the above-mentioned warning before closing the deal. Meanwhile, young bank clerk Billy Peltzer (Zach Galligan) must suffer such antagonists as rich-bitch Mrs. Deagle (Polly Holliday) and priggish Gerald (Judge Reinhold) while pursuing his romance with Kate (Phoebe Cates). These and a variety of other plot strands are tied together when the lovable mogwai (named Gizmo) is exposed to bright light and gotten wet. In short order, the town is invaded by nasty, predatory Gremlins, who lay waste to everything in sight as Billy and Kate try to contain the destruction. Like most of Joe Dante’s works, Gremlins is chock-full of significant cameo appearances: in this instance, such pop-culture icons as Dick Miller, Jackie Joseph, Chuck Jones, Scott Brady, Harry Carey Jr., Steven Spielberg (the film’s executive producer) and even Robby the Robot all show up briefly on screen.(ROTTEN TOMATOES)

Invasion of the Saucer Men a.k.a. Invasion of the Hell Creatures a.k.a.Spacemen Saturday Night (1957)

Invasion of the Saucer Men can’t make up its mind whether it wants to be a comedy, a j.d. melodrama or a horror outing. When a spaceship lands in the woods, Johnny (Steve Terrell) and Joan (Gloria Castillo) accidentally run over one of the aliens. In retaliation, the saucer-men kill Joe (Frank Gorshin), an opportunistic boozehound who stumbles across the body. Meanwhile, the hand of the extraterrestrial corpse detaches itself from its body and wreaks havoc on the countryside. But the aliens are foiled when it is discovered that they cannot withstand the glare of automobile headlights! The Saucer Men costumes were designed by Paul Blaisdell, who was certainly capable of better work. Lyn Osborn, the former Cadet Happy on TV’s Space Patrol, makes his final screen appearance as Frank Gorshin’s drinking buddy. Originally released on a double bill with I Was a Teenage Werewolf, Invasion of the Saucer Creatures was cheaply remade for television as The Eye Creatures (1966).(ROTTEN TOMATOES)

 

 

Michael & friends…

happy halloween!!

Fright Night 1985

With the remake now in the movie theatres let us please not forget the FANTASTIQUE original!!!

A teenage horror film addict is shocked to discover that his new next-door neighbor is a vampire in this delightful mix of horror and comedy. The problems only grow for young Charley Brewster (William Ragsdale) when he expresses his thoughts about fanged new neighbor Jerry Dandridge (Chris Sarandon). His girlfriend, Amy (Amanda Bearse), thinks Charley is avoiding their relationship issues, his single mom thinks Dandridge (Chris Sarandon) could be a potential boyfriend, and his buddy “Evil” (Stephen Geoffreys) just thinks Charley’s losing it. Worst of all, Dandridge and his nasty assistant, Billy Cole (Jonathan Stark), are on to Charley’s wild notions — and have plans to pay him a late-night visit to silence him. With no one to help him, Charley turns to the one man he knows has faced the wrath of the undead and lived, the fearless vampire killer Peter Vincent (Roddy McDowall). A washed-up actor who has just been fired from his job as the host of a late-night horror show, Vincent is not about to believe in the rantings of an impressionable teen. However, lured by Amy’s cash offer, he agrees to help her convince Charley that Dandridge isn’t a vampire. There is just one problem: Dandridge is a vampire and when Amy falls under his evil spell, its up Charley and Peter to drive a stake through their potential romance. (ROTTEN TOMATOES)

 

Night of the Comet 1984

In this satirical sci-fi comedy, Samantha (Kelli Maroney) and Regina (Catherine Mary Stewart) are two sisters whose father was a hard-bitten Green Beret, but who’ve grown into typical Valley Girls. They end up spending the night in a steel-lined room just as a comet passes close to the earth, vaporizing the people in its wake. When Samantha and Regina emerge, they discover that they have the city to themselves, and they begin the shopping spree to end all shopping sprees. En route to the mall, they discover Hector (Robert Beltran), the only survivor they’ve found so far, and they argue over who gets the last boyfriend on Earth. However, the mall holds an unpleasant surprise — a small army of zombified stockboys who the gals must battle using an arsenal they shoplifted along the way (while lamenting that “Daddy would have gotten us Uzis!” after a MAC-10 fails to fire). Meanwhile, a cadre of soldiers from a special military experiment have come out of hiding, but it seems that they need fresh blood to survive, and Samantha and Regina look like just the refreshment they need. Cult figure Mary Woronov also appears in a supporting role as a scientist. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi(ROTTEN TOMATOES)